News Headlines
Mon. Jul 26th 2021
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Congratulations to Snyder Firefighter Josh Sabitino, MSN, AGNP-C who recently passed his Board Certifications and is now a certified member of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners as an Adu...
Sat. Jul 24th 2021
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Congratulations to Firefighter Nick Cacciotti on graduating NYS Firefighter 1 Boot Camp! Nick worked hard to learn and demonstrate the vital skills needed to be a firefighter! This is a major mileston...
Mon. May 24th 2021
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Specifications for the supply and installation of camera systems in multiple Fire District vehicles.Click here for Specifications
Thu. May 20th 2021
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This week is #NationalEMSWeek, a week where we recognize and appreciate the valuable contributions to our communities Emergency Medical Services professionals provide. The Snyder Fire Department has o...
Fri. May 14th 2021
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Recently the Snyder Fire Department onboarded 3 new Firefighters! Wednesday night, May 12, Members trained on Live-Fire evolutions at the Amherst Fire Tower. Assistant Chief Hudson spent time working ...
Historical Archives

1941 - a young lady hops aboard the Snyder "White Car" - a 1932 retro-fitted 16 cylinder Cadillac that the department purchased in 1939 for $200. It was dubbed "The White Car" and was used in parades, conventions, and for fire police duty. The photo was possibly taken at a convention in Geneva, New York in August of 1941. Unfortunately, the names of the Snyder firefighter and young lady are lost to time. 

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1955 - Modern technology comes to the fire service as Snyder is the first department in Erie County to distribute radio home receivers to all members. Firefighters would now immediately know the location and nature of the emergency! Before this firefighters had to rely on a rooftop siren to alert them to an emergency call - if they were lucky enough to hear it. Pictured here admiring the state-of-the-art tube radio are the wife and daughters of Snyder Fire Chief Francis "Shorty" Ludwig.

 

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February 9, 1950: Buffalo Fire Commissioner Harold Becker pins the Chief's badge on Francis "Shorty" Ludwig as he is installed for his 10th term as Chief of Department. Ludwig would go on to serve a record 26 terms as Snyder's Chief. Also present at this installation dinner held at the venerable Buffalo Trap & Field Club are from left to right: Snyder Fire District Commissioner's J. Clark Ryan (commissioner 1947-1951), George Kohl (commissioner 1947-1963), Buffalo Commissioner Becker, Chief Ludwig, Snyder Fire District Commissioners Everett Guest (commissioner 1950-1963), Edward Drews (commissioner 1946-1959) and Dr. Daniel Rahill (commissioner 1947-1957).

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Circa early 1960's - Snyder hosted the Amherst Fire Council Memorial Breakfast and offered Monsignor McMahon from Christ the King Church a ride to the service on the ladder truck. As he was driven back to the church after the memorial service, parishioners were arriving for mass and the Monsignor was beaming like a little kid as rang the bell on the truck. The top photo shows Firefighters Joe Steiert, Dick Hall, Monsignor McMahan, and Firefighters Ken Rinebolt and Joe Weber.  Fire trucks can even bring excitement to men of the cloth!

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Circa late 1940's - John Scheller (member 1944-1960) standing wearing the dress cap (right) and two other unidentified Snyder Firefighters on a training night. Scheller was the assistant principal at Amherst High School as well. Veteran members recall the days when Snyder Torch Boys (between 16-18 years of age) would be allowed to leave school (sometimes with assistant principal Scheller) to answer alarms - they would even be paged over the intercom to report to the principal's office and they would all leave together.....oh for the simpler times!

 

 

 

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October 1976, Captain Thomas Kenney, Jr. (future Chief of Department and past Fire Commissioner) instructs Firefighter Brian Parkot (past Fire Commissioner) on the fine art of engine operations

 

 

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More action shots from December 28, 1955, at 77 Brantwood Road. This two-alarm fire raged for several hours and was complicated by frozen fire hydrants in the area. Chief Francis "Shorty" Ludwig commanded the scene and he reported firefighters had to lay-out over 2400 feet of fire hose before finding a working hydrant, delaying extinguishment efforts. The fire started when gasoline spilled out of a jug contractors were using to assist them in laying an asphalt tile floor in the basement. The gasoline ignited when the furnace kicked on causing the workers and residents in the house to scramble to safety. One worker suffered serious burns and another worker was credited with carrying an ill bedridden 7-year old boy out of the house. The home was owned by Dr. S. Mouchly Small, who was acting director of the Erie County Community Mental Health Board as well as head of psychiatry of the UB Medical School and the old Meyer Memorial Hospital (now ECMC).  Click on Picture to enlarge

 

December 28, 1955-Snyder firefighters along with Amherst Police Department officer John Griffin come to the aid of Snyder Junior Captain (the current title would be Lieutenant) John Bresnahan at the scene of a house fire at Dr. Small's residence, 77 Brantwood Road. Sadly, Bresnahan was lost in the line of duty in 1966 at a fire at Park School.

 

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Ground ladder training circa 1965. Under the watchful eye of Captain "Big Joe" Agricola, Firefighter Thomas Kenney (Senior) waits his turn to climb the ladder with the line behind Firefighter Charles Fink.

 

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February 1985, Snyder fought one of the biggest residential fires in its history when a fire ripped through a home on Harper Road. Thousands of bolts of fabric material stored in the basement for a clothes-making operation compounded firefighting efforts and mutual aid was provided by Williamsville Fire Department, Eggertsville Hose Company, and the Getzville Fire Company. Luckily nobody was seriously hurt but firefighters did assist an elderly resident out of the house upon arrival. Many cats and several dogs perished in the blaze. Operating on the roof shortly after arrival, Firefighters Tom Merrill (center), Mark Van Horn (right), and Andrew Giese (far left) work to ventilate the roof.

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House FireSnyder Firefighters in action at a house fire in an unidentified subdivision, possibly the Delamere Road area. Note the 1936 Buffalo Fire Appliance (Snyder Engine 2) backed into the driveway. The other rigs are Engine 5 (right) a 1954 Ward LaFrance, Engine 3 (left) a 1946 Buffalo, and Truck 1 (behind Engine 3) a 1942 Buffalo affectionately called "The Quad". This great photo certainly exemplifies that long-standing attraction between fire departments and the public as all these neighbors gathered to watch the activity.

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Circa 1955 - Firefighter Fred Ludwig mans the desk in the house watch office. In front of him is the venerable Gamewell ticker tape that would produce a coded signal indicating the street the alarm was on. That coded signal was also blown by the rooftop siren so firefighters could hear it and know where to respond to. Oh for the simpler days..........

 

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Possibly the first-ever photo taken of the "new" Snyder firehouse built-in 1922.  This photo was donated by a resident and has a handwritten note on it indicating it was taken at a parade in 1922. If it truly was 1922, the photo would most likely have been taken on August 5, 1922, which was the date of the Snyder Hose Company picnic and parade that year. This would make this photo the very first ever taken of the brand new Snyder firehouse which hosted its first meeting two days later on August 7, 1922. Note the cupola on the roof –that was removed in 1934 to make room for a new rooftop siren. Also, the fire truck is not a Snyder truck as the first motorized Snyder fire truck didn't arrive until 1925.
 

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In the early morning hours of Wednesday, December 28, 1983, Snyder Firefighters were alerted for Mutual Aid to Buffalo Fire. Snyder Fire responded with Rescue 5. This was used to provide scene lighting, as the Rescue at the time had 2 large light towers. Firefighters operated from 01:19 to 04:00 hours. Pictured is the incident as logged in our 1983 Run Book. The location is listed as Seneca and Emslie, at the intersection of Swan, the quarters of BFD Engine 32/Ladder 5. 

 

 

 

 


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